TIMELINE

 

1912                     - born in Canon, Lot-et-Garonne, may 14

from 1929 on      - Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Marseille

1932 – 1934        - Ecole nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris (ENSBA)

1935 – 1936        - first work: Palais Albert 1er, (in collaboration with Henri    Enjouvin), Aix-en-Provence

From 1946 on     - Stade de la Torse, Aix-en-Provence

1947 – 1953        - The Old Port of Marseille and La Tourette, Marseille

1950 – 1963        - seaside resort Les Sablettes, La Seyne-sur-mer

1951 – 1953        - The 200 Apartments, Aix-en-Provence

1953 – 1954        - The housing estate Diar es-Saada, Algiers, Algeria

1953 – 1954        - The housing estate Diar el-Mahçoul, Algiers, Algeria

1954 – 1957        - Climat de France, Algiers, Algeria

1954 – 1964        - Train stations of  Mashad et Tabriz, Iran

1957 – 1963        - Residence Victor Hugo, Pantin

1959 – 1961        - Parc Residence, Meudon-la-Forêt

1961                     - arrested in March

                              - excluded from the French Architects’ Order

1962                     - jailbreak on September 9

1963                     - return to France for the trial

                              - sentenced to prison, return to prison on July 13

1964                     - due to his bad state of health, he was released from prison for a  year

                             - publication of the novel “The Savage Stones”; Editions du Seuil, Paris

1965                     - arrested again in February

                             - goes into hunger strike

                             - for health issues:  definitely liberated February 25

1965                    - literary prize for  “The Savage Stones” : Prix des Deux Magots

1967                    - Zeralda, Algiers, Algeria

1968                    - Tipaza, Algeria

1968                    - publication of the autobiography “Memories of an architect”; Editions du Seuil, Paris

1967 – 1970       - Quartier de la Brèche-aux-Loups, Ozoir-la-Ferrière

1971                    - pardoned by President Georges Pompidou on may 12

1974                    - creation of the publishing house Le Jardin de Flore

1974 – 1982       - restoration of the  Château de Belcastel

1978                    - reintegrated to the Franche Architects’ Order

1984                    - Fernand Pouillon is awarded the “ grade d’officier de la Légion d’honneur”, in particular for                                                          his works in Algeria, by François Mitterand

                            - official inauguration of the Château de Belcastel July 6

1985 – 1987      - Municipal music conservatory Jacques Ibert, Paris

1985                  - Apartments avenue Jean-Jaurès 180, Paris

2005                  - two American gallerists acquire the Château de Belcastel and open it to the public

2012                  - symposium for the 100th anniversary of Fernand Pouillon at the Château de Belcastel

2017                  - Founding of the Fernand Pouillon Heritage Association

 
 

MONUMENTAL PROJECTS

 

Palais Albert 1er (1935 - 1936)

The Palais Albert the 1st was Fernand Pouillon’s first construction. Pouillon built the six-story apartment complex at the entrance to the old quarter of Aix-en-Provence, in collaboration with fellow architect Henri Enjouvin. The building was designed in the art-deco style. Two businesses operate on the ground floor, underneath the apartment’s 30 housing units.

 

The Old Port of Marseille and La Tourette (1947 - 1953)

{ Fernand Pouillon Projets. Archigraphie [online]. Available at : http://www.archigraphie.eu/?p=642. (Accessed on 28/07/2017). }

The Old Port of Marseille was destroyed by the Germans in 1943 and after the war, the need for reconstruction was huge. Initially, Fernand Pouillon was one of many architects in charge of the reconstruction of the Old Port quarter. Along with his team, he constructed the housing complex La Tourette at the westernmost part of the port. In collaboration with his engineers and contractors, he managed to build the housing complex at a very low price; this encouraged the inhabitants of the destructed houses at the harborfront to protest against the high prices that other groups of architects estimated for their projects. Since Pouillon could offer better buildings at a lower price, he was engaged as principal architect of the harborfront. The ground floor of the harborfront buildings now houses a shopping center, just as it did before the destruction of the port.

 

Immeubles Pouillon. Tourisme Marseille [online]. Available at : http://www.tourisme-marseille.com/fiche/immeubles-fernand-pouillon-marseille/. (Accessed on 16/07/2017).

VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p. 90 – 104.

 

Nestlé Factory, Marseille (1949-1952)

Along with architect René Egger, Fernand Pouillon was hired in 1949 to construct a new factory for the Nestlé corporation in Marseille. Nestlé’s leadership wished to take advantage of the port of Marseille as a convenient location for the importing and exporting of their products. The ambitious architectural endeavor included the creation of two automated units for making chocolate and instant coffee, as well as administrative buildings and living quarters for the workers. The factory is noted for certain decorative elements on its facade, including striking variations in color and texture. The abundance of green spaces amongst the factory buildings led to the factory’s alias: “the green factory” of Marseille, which was designated a Heritage Site of the 20th century.

ROY, Eve. Direction régionale des affaires culturelles Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. Label Patrimoine du XXe siècle en région Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, Usine Nestlé. [Online]. (28 November 2000) Available at: <archive.wikiwix.com/cache/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.paca.culture.gouv.fr%2Fdossiers%2Fxxeme_label%2Fnotices%2F13%2Fmarseille%2Fusine_nestle%2Fusine.htm> (Accessed on 16 July 2017)

 

Seaside Resort “Les Sablettes” (1950 - 1953)

The original seaside resort at Les Sablettes in the town of La Seyne-sur-Mer, dating from 1887, was destroyed by the Germans during the Second World War. In 1950, Fernand Pouillon was engaged to rebuild the seaside resort. After three years of work, a new village had been built, consisting of social housing, a hotel, restaurants and boutiques, as wells as bathing stations, a casino and a small harbour. All the buildings were constructed using the white stone of the Pont du Gard, a quarry located in the Provence region of France.

TILLIER, Alice. Les Sablettes de Fernand Pouillon. L’express [online]. 07/08/2003. Available at: http://www.lexpress.fr/informations/les-sablettes-de-fernand-pouillon_652651.html. (Accessed on 26/07/2017).

DENANTE, Sylvie. La Seyne-sur-Mer – Les Sablettes. Culutrecommunication.gouv.fr [online]. 2000. Available at : http://www.culturecommunication.gouv.fr/Regions/Drac-Paca/Politique-et-actions-culturelles/Patrimoine-du-XXe-siecle/Le-label/Les-edifices-labellises/Label-patrimoine-du-XXe-Var/La-Seyne-sur-Mer/La-Seyne-sur-Mer-Les-Sablettes. (Accessed on 26/07/2017).

 

Law Faculty Library in Aix-en-Provence (1950-1954)

Once again in collaboration with René Egger, Pouillon undertook the construction of the library of the faculty of Law in Aix-en-Provence. The library opens toward the south end of the Law faculty site, and includes three distinct buildings situated around an interior courtyard. At the entrance a covered gallery is surrounded by columns of impressive size. The entire structure is covered in stones that emphasize the neoclassical style of the faculty site.

DENANTE, Sylvie. Direction régionale des affaires culturelles Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. Label Patrimoine du XXe siècle en région Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, Bibliothèque de la faculté de droit. [Online]. (16 November 2017) Available at: <archive.wikiwix.com/cache/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.paca.culture.gouv.fr%2Fdossiers%2Fxxeme_label%2Fnotices%2F13%2Faix_en_provence%2Fbiblio_fac_droit%2Fbiblio.htm> (Accessed on 16 July 2017)

 

The 200 Apartments of Aix en Provence  (1951 - 1953)

{ Fernand Pouillon Projets. Archigraphie [online]. Available at : http://www.archigraphie.eu/?p=642. (Accessed on 28/07/2017). }

Fernand Pouillon was very unhappy with the quality and cost of social housing in his time. In order to show that high quality and low prices could go hand in hand, Pouillon suggested to the city of Aix-en-Provence that he construct “two hundred apartments, two hundred meters from the city, within two hundred days, and for two hundred million.” (POUILLON, Fernand. Mémoires d’un architecte. Paris : Editions du Seuil, 1968, p. 141.)  The audacity of the ambitious “200 apartments project,” which Pouillon successfully completed with the assistance of his colleague René Egger, helped to earn him many further architectural assignments. (VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p. 116.)  

 

The Diar es-Saada Housing Estate (1953 - 1954)

Fernand Pouillon was invited to Algeria by the mayor of Alger, Jacques Chevallier, in order to build accommodation units. Once there, he was designated principal architect for the Office of Rent-Controlled Housing in Alger (HLM. Available at:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HLM. (Accessed on: 30/07/2017.). Within a year after the first stone had been laid, in August 1953, “732 apartments of between two and four rooms, a school, a post office, 32 shops and a sports center” had been erected. (VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p. 169.) were built. (POUILLON, Fernand. Mémoires d’un architecte. Paris : Editions du Seuil, 1968, p. 164.). The houses of the “city of happiness,” (Diar-es-Saâda, la Cité d’Alger. Available at : http://diaressaada.alger.free.fr. (Accessed on 21/07/2017).) or or ‘Diar es-Saada’ in Arabic, were built with the same stones as the Old Port of Marseille – they were shipped from the Provence region of southern France. (VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p.170.)

 

The Diar el-Mahçoul Housing Estate (1953 - 1954)

{ Fernand Pouillon Projets. Archigraphie [online]. Available at : http://www.archigraphie.eu/?p=642. (Accessed on 28/07/2017). }

At the same time as Diar es-Saada, another housing estate was built on a hill overseeing  (VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p.169) Alger: Diar el-Mahçoul, “the city of the honored promise” (POUILLON, Fernand. Mémoires d’un architecte. Paris : Editions du Seuil, 1968, p. 210.). This estate consists of 19 buildings of five floors on average, a tower of 20 floors overlooking the market place, a church, a post office and several shops. The 1550 apartments in Diar el-Mahçoul are divided into two parts: appartments of “normal comfort” and apartments of “simple comfort.” The “simple comfort” apartments are smaller: instead of a separate kitchen, there is a small kitchenette in the living room, and the bathroom consists of a Turkish toilet and a washbasin. The exterior of the whole estate is decorated with waterfalls, fountains and plants, as in Diar es-Saada. (VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p. 169 – 174.)

 

Climat de France (1954 - 1957)

{ Fernand Pouillon Projets. Archigraphie [online]. Available at : http://www.archigraphie.eu/?p=642. (Accessed on 28/07/2017). }

The housing estate “Climat de France” was constructed on a slope. It was a particularly daring undertaking, since the mountain on which the 5000 apartments were to be built was not stable and was in fact gliding downhill. (POUILLON, Fernand. Mémoires d’un architecte. Paris : Editions du Seuil, 1968, p. 198 – 199. ; VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p.176). To prevent the ground from eroding, Pouillon constructed a curving building underneath the estate. Between two groups of buildings of different heights, there is a central courtyard called the “200 Columns”: a big square building that opens on an inner courtyard; the interior walls are made up of columns, from which the building’s name arises. The estate was built for military personnel and for Algerians fleeing from the war. Nowadays, it is only inhabited by Algerians, as the Europeans have since left.

DANIEL, Julien. Climat de France, la plus grande cité d’Alger. Le monde [Online]. 21/05/2012. Available at: http://www.lemonde.fr/international/portfolio/2012/05/21/climat-de-france-la-plus-grande-cite-d-alger_1704557_3210.html. (Accessed on: 22/07/2017.).   

VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p.176.

 

Train stations of Machad and Tabriz, Iran (1954 - 1964)

{ Fernand Pouillon Projets. Archigraphie [online]. Available at : http://www.archigraphie.eu/?p=642. (Accessed on 28/07/2017). }

Fernand Pouillon was engaged by the Iranian state to finish two projects that had been started and interrupted two years before. Pouillon was requested to undertake the construction of the two train stations in Machad and Tabriz. This project was particularly important for Iran because the train stations enabled the construction of railways on an axis running from east to west, joining Machad, a Muslim pilgrimage city, to Tehran, and finally to Tibraz on the Russian border; this finally united the country.

POUILLON, Fernand. Mémoires d’un architecte. Paris : Editions du Seuil, 1968, p. 242 – 250.

 

The Victor Hugo Apartment Block, Pantin (1957 - 1963)

In the suburbs of Paris, the Victor Hugo Apartment Block was constructed on old distillery grounds: 262 apartments of three- to ten-storeys made of stone and pink marble. There are two different types of apartments within the building: three-room apartments of about 50 square meters each, and five-room apartments of 72,88 square meters.

Fernand Pouillon Projets. Archigraphie [Online]. Available at : http://www.archigraphie.eu/?p=642. (Accessed on 29/07/2017).

VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p. 186 – 187.

 

The Stade de Buffalo Apartment Block, Montrouge (1955 - 1958)

{La résidence Buffalo. Hauts de seine [en ligne]. Disponible sur: http://www.ville-montrouge.fr/993-la-residence-buffalo.htm. (Consulté le 11/08/2017.).}

Concurrently with the Victor Hugo apartments, Pouillon built the Stade de Buffalo apartment block on the outskirts of Paris. Just like the rest of the housing complexes Pouillon constructed, this one was also designed to embody the notion of a “true urban ensemble” (VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p.187.). Though the housing block appears massive at first glance, there is nevertheless quite a bit of detail in its layout, including several plants and fountains. (VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p.187.)

 

Parc Residence, Meudon-la-Forêt (1959 - 1961)

Pouillon also constructed 2,635 apartments in Meudon-la-Forêt, a suburb of Paris, according to plans that arose from a collaboration with fellow architect and city-planner Robert Azuelle. Pouillon devised the majority of the architectural plans, while Azuelle was responsible for the zoning. As with all of the housing estates Pouillon designed, the Parc Residence is more than just a simple grouping of apartment complexes; rather, it also includes several shops, schools, a church and the city hall on the territory of the housing estate.

Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication . Le Lotissement : histoires d’une architecture sans histoire . Une exposition conçue et réalisée par le ministère de la Cultureet de la Communication, direction générale des Patrimoines [en ligne]. 2015. Disponible sur: http://www.culturecommunication.gouv.fr/content/download/109623/1273687/version/1/file/MCC-livret_lotissements.pdf, p. 44. (Consulté le 29/07/2017.).

 

The Point-du-Jour Residence in Boulogne-Billancourt

In Boulogne-Billancourt on the outskirts of Paris, Fernand Pouillon had 2,260 social housing accommodations built on an industrial land area. In addition to the accommodations there are shops and amenities in the 25 buildings. This ambitious building project brought about many problems for Pouillon. Firstly, Pouillon was not only the architect but also the contractor for the Point-du-Jour project – an arrangement that was forbidden in France at the time. Consequently, Pouillon was arrested and sentenced to prison, from which he escaped in 1963. He was released once and for all in February 1965. An additional consequence of the Point-du-Jour affair was Pouillon’s exclusion from the French national Order of Architects.

VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006.

POUILLON, Fernand. Mémoires d’un architecte. Paris : Editions du Seuil, 1968.

LE CHATELIER, Luc. Fernand Pouillon, monumental architecte. Télérama [Online]. Available at: http://www.telerama.fr/monde/fernand-pouillon-monumental-architecte,45393.php. (Accessed 11/08/201.).

La résidence du Point-du-Jour à Boulogne-Billancourt. Architecte [online]. Available at: http://www.culturecommunication.gouv.fr/Thematiques/Architecture/Publications-et-audiovisuel/Publications/La-residence-du-Point-du-Jour-a-Boulogne-Billancourt. (Accessed on 11/08/2017.).

Official guidebook of the Château de Belcastel, with Vera Pouillon.

Brochure Résidence du Point-du-Jour. Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication, direction générale des Patrimoines, 2015 [online]. Available at: www.culturecommunication.gouv.fr/content/download/133825/1444868/version/1/file/Boulogne_light_1.pdf+&cd=1&hl=de&ct=clnk&gl=at. (Accessed on 11/08/2017.).

 

Air Terminal at the Marseille-Provence Airport in Marignane (1961)

The air terminal at Marseille-Provence Airport was designed by Fernand Pouillon and opened in 1961. Pouillon developed the structure for 3 million travelers, triple the usual amount for the period, and took passengers’ comfort into special consideration in planning for short walking distances, lighting, and signage. The terminal comprises a surface of 19,000 m2 and includes a main hallway whose concrete colonnade forms the impressive entrance passage. Pouillon’s terminal is the particular part of the Marseille-Provence Airport that received the label ‘Heritage Site of the 20th Century.’ With its striking prestressed concrete construction, this air terminal merits comparison with the two train stations Pouillon designed in Iran.

Patrimoine XX, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur. PACA Culture, Aéroport Marseille Provence. [Online]. Available at: <archive.wikiwix.com/cache/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.paca.culture.gouv.fr%2Fdossiers%2Fxxeme%2Ffr_13.htm> (Accessed on 24 July 2017)

FUZIBET, Agnès. Ministère de la Culture. Marignane - Aéroport Marseille-Provence - Ministère de la Culture, Drac PACA. [Online]. (2000) Available at: <www.culturecommunication.gouv.fr/Regions/Drac-Paca/Politique-et-actions-culturelles/Patrimoine-du-XXe-siecle/Le-label/Les-edifices-labellises/Label-patrimoine-du-XXe-Bouches-du-Rhone/Marignane/Marignane-Aeroport-Marseille-Provence> (Accessed on 24 July 2017)

 

Zeralda, Algeria (1967)

{ Fernand Pouillon Projets. Archigraphie [Online]. Available at: http://www.archigraphie.eu/?p=642. (Accessed on 28/07/2017). }

In Zeralda, a suburb of Algiers, (Zeralda. Wikipedia [Online]. Available at :  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z%C3%A9ralda. (Accessed on 26/07/2017.).)  Fernand Pouillon constructed a tourist village consisting of hotels and autonomous bungalows. Inspired by his social housing projects, Zeralda is made up of small private areas as well as well-equipped communal exterior areas. There is, for example, in Zeralda a theatre with a view of the sea and the outdoor paths are decorated with plants. (VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p.280.) The main gateway entrance opens onto a shopping centre with a vaulted, fish bone patterned ceiling. A tower is situated on the central square, which implies that Fernand Pouillon was inspired by the plan of a stereotypical city for his tourist complexes and housing estates.

MAACHI MAÏZA, Myriam. L’architecture de Fernand Pouillon en Algérie. Insaniyat / إنسانيات [Online] 42 | 2008. Published on 30/09/2012. Available at: http://insaniyat.revues.org/6707 ; DOI : 10.4000/insaniyat.6707. (Accessed on 26/07/2017.).

 

The Brèche-aux-Loups District (1967-1970)

During his exile in Algeria, Fernand Pouillon designed the district of the Brèche-aux-Loups. In the Parisian suburbs, in Ozoir-la-Ferrière, 400 individual homes were built alongside shops and a cultural center, creating more of a village than a simple housing estate. Also notable is the fact that the architect integrated several green spaces around the premises: in the heart of the estate are a park and a canal that spans the entire district.

Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication . Le Lotissement : histoires d’une architecture sans histoire . Une exposition conçue et réalisée par le ministère de la Cultureet de la Communication, direction générale des Patrimoines [online]. 2015. Available at: http://www.culturecommunication.gouv.fr/content/download/109623/1273687/version/1/file/MCC-livret_lotissements.pdf, p. 23. (Accessed on 29/07/2017.).

 

Tipaza, Algeria (1968)

Fernand Pouillon constructed three tourist complexes in the Mediterranean style on the seaside in Tipaza, some 100 kilometers from Algiers: Tipaza-Club, Tipaza la Corne d’Or and Tipaza Matarès. The small village Tipaza la Corne d’Or consists of small houses, two restaurants, a bar and a nautical port. Tipaza Matarès comprises 43 three-room homes and two hotels, as well as some restaurants and a bar. This tourist complex was one of Fernand Pouillon’s projects designed to boost tourism in Algeria. The three complexes still host visitors, and Tipaza la Corne d’Or was recently renovated.

(Algérie – Complexe touristique « La Corne d’Or » à Tipaza. Mondial Dz [Online]. Available at : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3tnkDEWXTM. (Accessed on 24/07/2017).)

Complexe touristique Corne d’Or Tipaza. Algérie-Monde [online]. Available at: http://www.algerie-monde.com/hotels/tipaza/corne-d-or/. (Accessed on 24/07/2017.).

LE CHATELIER, Luc. Tipaza, le détonnant complexe touristique de Pouillon. Telerama.fr [Online]. Available at : http://www.telerama.fr/monde/tipaza-le-detonnant-complexe-touristique-de-pouillon,45212.php. (Accessed on 24/07/2017.).

Tipaza, une station balnéaire algérienne très en vue. rfi [Online]. Available at : http://www1.rfi.fr/radiofr/editions/116/edition_148282.asp. (Accessed on 24/07/2017.).

Complexe touristique de Matarès. Algérie-Monde [Online]. Available at: http://www.algerie-monde.com/hotels/tipaza/matares/. (Accessed on 24/07/2017.).

VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p.280.

 

Sidi-Fredj Tourist Complex, nearby Algiers 1968

On the Sidi-Fredj peninsula, located 30 kilometers west of Algiers, Fernand Pouillon constructed a complex of several buildings as part of a lively new tourist center. The complex included the port, several restaurants, a theater, a housing district, and hotels with 4,000 beds between them. This includes the El Marsa hotel, notable for its angular walls of whitewashed concrete and its alluring swimming pool.

Wikipédia. Sidi-Fredj (Alger). [Online]. (Modified on 18 April 2017) Available at: <https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidi-Fredj_(Alger)> (Accessed on 24 July 2017)

MAACHI MAÏZA, Myriam. Insaniyat - Revue algérienne d’anthropologie et de sciences sociales. L’architecture de Fernand Pouillon en Algérie. [Online]. (2008) Available at: <https://insaniyat.revues.org/6707> (Accessed on 24 July 2017)

 

The Jacques Ibert Municipal Music Conservatory, Paris (1985 - 1987)

Fernand Pouillon won the competition for the construction of the Jacques Ibert Municipal Music Conservatory in Paris’s 19th district; this commission demonstrated that the city of Paris wanted to forget the “Point du Jour affair.” The first model was created in the spring of 1985, and the construction of the conservatory began one month after Pouillon’s death. The building was completed in 1987. (Conservatoire de Musique et de Danse Jacques Ibert. Paris promeneurs [Online]. Available at: http://www.paris-promeneurs.com/Architecture-moderne/Conservatoire-de-Musique-et-de. (Accessed on 22/07/2017.)) This work, one of Pouillon’s last, is especially notable for its harmony and purity. There is a fountain on the right side of the Conservatory building. VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p. 308 – 309.

 

Apartments avenue Jean-Jaurès 180, Paris (1985)

Also in 1985, after his victory at the competition for the Jacques Ibert Municipal Music Conservatory, Pouillon was recommended by the Elysée Palace and was engaged to build a housing complex in Paris. The buildings with 130 apartments located at 180-184 Avenue Jean-Jaurès also contain shops on the ground floor.

VOLDMAN, Danièle. Fernand Pouillon, Architecte. Paris : Editions Payot & Rivages, 2006, p. 309 – 311.